Do you make me uncomfortable? Good.

Karen Hitchcock takes you out of comfort zone

Go ahead, crank it up to 90!

In the past week, I’ve been in at least two situations that, years ago, would have made me very uncomfortable. That’s because they involved delivering unpleasant news. In one conversation I had to tell someone that they didn’t win a bid and in another, I challenged a business owner/client on some of her assumptions. Many of you may find these conversations easy, but I imagine that like me, many people equate these situations with conflict. I used to do anything to avoid conflict, even preferring to break bad news via the modern, chicken sh*t-way…email.

But these conversations were surprisingly easy and I’m so glad I had them.  Having them meant that I was acting authentically, presenting my genuine self.  And, the conversations gave me the idea for this post (and a few more to boot).

Over the course of the morning, I’ve been thinking about all the ways we avoid being uncomfortable. We go to the same restaurants, hang out with the same friends, engage business with like-minded people, design things the same way…anything to avoid getting outside of the comfort zone. And why should we want to leave that comfort zone? It’s cozy, familiar, safe.

And that, my friends, is a problem. Being safe (professionally speaking) will keep you with the same colleagues, the same ideas, same designs and the same outlook. And this, I believe, translates to a limited amount of growth, in both the personal value that you add to your relationships and even to the amount your company (or salary) can grow. I can’t tell you how often I’ve heard:

We can’t do it that way. That won’t work. She always does that. We always do it this way. My way is proven and it works. No use reinventing the wheel. Blah, blah, blah.

The meaty stuff, the hard stuff, the uncomfortable stuff that pushes you outside of your comfort zone is what will keep you growing and ultimately, thriving, in your professional life. Probably your personal one too.

So try doing something really uncomfortable. I’ll give you a suggestion. Apologize to someone. No one likes to admit they’re wrong, but the next time you are (if you can even recognize it), just say so. It is amazingly freeing and you may be surprised that it doesn’t make you look incompetent. Rather, it makes you more trustworthy.

I read a great book by Aaron Lazare, titled On Apology. If you’re unsure about the power of apologies, check out this little gem of a book. One reason people fail to apologize is that  they think it will make them appear weak, especially in the business world. On the contrary, a sincere, well-timed apology makes you appear strong and confident.

A client last week apologized to me for mis-communication. Wow, how refreshing! He totally could have sidestepped that situation, even blamed it on me since I do work at his discretion. The result of his apology means I want to work that much harder for him. It showed humility, leadership and confidence. How cool is that?

Will you go out of your comfort zone? And if you do, let me know. I would love to hear how it goes.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in General Musings, Management, Marketing and Strategy. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Do you make me uncomfortable? Good.

  1. nick says:

    Very well put Karen, I too am stepping up and facing facts, fears and situations. Very cathartic.

    • Nick, it is hard, but so refreshing and cathartic. Well said. My next post is going to be about “ego” and how that is what ends up ruining most things. Professionally, there’s nothing worse than working for someone with a brittle ego (which usually masquerades as confidence, arrogance and sometimes aggression!)

  2. Amie says:

    Well stated and a great reminder to all. This is the third “embrace and tackle your fears” statement that has come my way in as many days, not letting me escape my need to get out of my comfort zone professionally and personally–the outcomes may not be exactly as desired, but as someone once said, “nothing ventured, nothing gained”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s